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Mary Ann Kitchell Art Blog

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Mary Ann Kitchell

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When clear pictures are received I begin with a rough sketch, followed by this more detailed one. I've straightened lines, added or deleted details as needed. An indication of shadows is included, as this will be my "working" sketch to be transferred to Arches watercolor paper… Continue reading… 0 comments

After transferring to watercolor paper, the first washes of paint are applied. I like to start with the largest ones: (sky, lawn, roof) to feel I'm making a lot of progress. My favorite thing at this stage is making a gray sky turn blue… Continue reading… 0 comments

I've added all the smaller details as well as checking what's already been done. This is the time I adjust values or change colors to more accurately depict the house… Continue reading… 0 comments

The house portrait is finished and matted for delivery. I'm able to trim bushes where necessary and add flowers at the client's request; Winter scenes can be transformed into Spring/Summer. If I've given you the feeling you're "home", I've done my job… Continue reading… 0 comments

Stone has always been one of my favorite things to render, whether as an architectural detail on a house, or as part of a stone wall. Both can be a variety of irregular shapes, very textural, with various colors or color combinations. This ink drawing was a pleasure to create, though watercolor could have been the more interesting choice. Painting wet into wet can create some wonderful stone colors… Continue reading… 0 comments

Pencil was the first medium used when I started selling art in the 70's. As my skill improved and I started exploring with color my work gradually evolved to using watercolor. I've been experimenting with pencil again, and like the look of this pet portrait completed with colored pencil and a 2B drawing pencil… Continue reading… 0 comments

One of the interesting things about painting house portraits is the ability to change structural details when necessary. This ink drawing was completed using old and new photographs and notes from the client detailing memories of the house from her past. I love the architectural look that was achieved. It was necessary to show something of the neighboring homes, but those portions of the drawing were kept to a bare minimum… Continue reading… 0 comments

TECHNIQUE What you see is not always what you get. The challenge here was the right shade of brown for the siding on the left and the stone on the right. Watercolors dry lighter than when wet so I try to plan for this when mixing paint. Another layer may be needed to get the right color. It doesn't have to be a disaster if the color dries too dark; it is sometimes possible to wipe out some of the color to get the desired effect. Along the same lines if your color doesn't look as warm or cool as that in the photographs, another layer may bring the color closer to the true shade. Keep in mind we work with paint that's not the same as house paint, nor are all printers accurate in depicting true color. As always, when in doubt ... ask the client… Continue reading… 0 comments